5 Things We Learned From 'Scientology and the Aftermath,' Episode 4 - 2016-12-21

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F344.png 5 Things We Learned From 'Scientology and the Aftermath,' Episode 4 December 21, 2016, Amelia McDonell-Parry, Rolling Stone

Thanks to strong ratings in its first few weeks – including their highest series premiere numbers since 2014A&E's Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath surprised viewers with not one, but two episodes this Christmas week. In Monday's special installment, Remini answered questions from her Reddit "Ask Me Anything" and introduced the story of Paulette Cooper, a journalist who was allegedly the target of a nasty Scientology PR campaign called "Operation Freakout." (More on that in a bit.) That was followed up by last night's hour, which focused on current Church of Scientology leader, David Miscavige. Here's what we learned from these two back-to-back episode.

1. Members are advised to watch out for "entheta"If there's one recurring lesson from the show, it's that the Church doesn't take criticism very well. Hubbard coined the term "entheta" to describe news, information and circumstances which disturb, agitate or otherwise upset "theta," his word for "life force." Scientologists are taught that simply engaging with anything that could be considered entheta – that is, anything negative or upsetting – hinders their spiritual progress. It is to be rejected, full stop.

Remini said that as she was becoming disillusioned with the organization, she tried to discuss her concerns about some the allegations she'd read online with two of her closest friends; they allegedly wrote up a Church Knowledge Report on her. "Scientologists will turn you in," the actress claims. "Doesn't matter if it's your child, your mother, your father, your husband."


{{cite news | author = Amelia McDonell-Parry | title = 5 Things We Learned From 'Scientology and the Aftermath,' Episode 4 | url = http://www.rollingstone.com/tv/news/5-things-we-learned-from-scientology-the-aftermath-ep-4-w457153 | work = Rolling Stone | date = December 21, 2016 | accessdate = January 17, 2017 }}