ANTI-CULT GROUP DISMEMBERED AS FORMER FOES BUY ITS ASSETS - 1996-12-01

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F43.png ANTI-CULT GROUP DISMEMBERED AS FORMER FOES BUY ITS ASSETS December 1, 1996, Laurie Goodstein, Washington Post

For 20 years, the Cult Awareness Network ran the nation's best-known hot line for parents who grew distraught when an unconventional religious group they neither trusted nor understood suddenly won the allegiance of their children.

From its offices here in a Chicago suburb, the network (known as CAN) answered more than 350 telephone inquiries a week, counseled relatives at conferences attended by thousands, and gave news interviews to everyone from small-town daily newspapers to "Nightline."

As CAN's influence rose, so did the ire of its foes, who were furious at being depicted as dangerous cults.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | author = Laurie Goodstein | title = ANTI-CULT GROUP DISMEMBERED AS FORMER FOES BUY ITS ASSETS | url = https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1996/12/01/anti-cult-group-dismembered-as-former-foes-buy-its-assets/c64962b7-f35a-435a-96aa-8c0d70c873e8/ | work = Washington Post | date = December 1, 1996 | accessdate = February 17, 2017 }}