Americans for Job Security - how a shadow group hustles for funds - 2010-10-26

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F0.png Americans for Job Security - how a shadow group hustles for funds October 26, 2010, Peter H. Stone, Center for Public Integrity

Long-time GOP operative David Carney is hardly a household name like Karl Rove. But among Republican strategists and fundraisers in Washington D.C., Texas, and other states, Carney is well-known as an aggressive and controversial figure who periodically operates under the radar.

Those qualities are also hallmarks of Americans for Job Security — a shadowy advocacy group that Carney, who is in his early 50s, founded in 1997. The group has poured almost $9 million dollars into negative ads this year to help Congressional candidates, putting it in the top tier of GOP-allied groups attracting big donors who want to remain secret.

Part of a broad, new phenomenon shaking up the 2010 mid-term election, Americans for Job Security is one of many well-organized groups that are not required to disclose donors' names as they go on advertising spending sprees in selected races. Beyond that, though, Americans for Job Security's track record suggests it has gone a bit further — proactively offering its help to donors who are seeking to cover their tracks. And its founder has earned a reputation with some GOP heavyweights as a man who sometimes pushes the boundaries of campaign finance limits.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Peter H. | last = Stone | title = Americans for Job Security - how a shadow group hustles for funds | url = https://publicintegrity.org/federal-politics/americans-for-job-security-how-a-shadow-group-hustles-for-funds/ | work = Center for Public Integrity | date = October 26, 2010 | accessdate = October 30, 2019 }}