Authorities are yanking the legacy of slaveholder John C. Calhoun from public sphere, but his bigotry remains embedded in American society - 2020-06-26

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F0.png Authorities are yanking the legacy of slaveholder John C. Calhoun from public sphere, but his bigotry remains embedded in American society June 26, 2020, Christian K. Anderson, The Conversation

Calhoun, who was born in 1782 and died a decade before the Civil War began, in 1850, was not only a slaveholder and an ardent defender of slavery, but a chief architect of the political system that allowed slavery to persist.

More enduring than the effects of his political career – which included the annexation of Texas to expand the number of slaveholding states – are the repercussions of his political ideology.

As a political theorist, Calhoun is best known for two ideas: "concurrent majority" and "nullification." A concurrent majority is the notion that a minority of the electorate – namely, one with money and property – can veto a political majority.

This idea is related to his belief in nullification theory, which is the idea that a state can void federal laws. Nullification made the idea of South Carolina seceding from the nation – and the creation of the Confederacy – a political possibility and then a reality.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Christian K. | last = Anderson | title = Authorities are yanking the legacy of slaveholder John C. Calhoun from public sphere, but his bigotry remains embedded in American society | url = https://theconversation.com/authorities-are-yanking-the-legacy-of-slaveholder-john-c-calhoun-from-public-sphere-but-his-bigotry-remains-embedded-in-american-society-140917 | work = The Conversation | date = June 26, 2020 | accessdate = October 8, 2021 }}