Backbreaker: A half-kilo of blow, machine-gun blasts, and a millionaire chiropractor. Does this make sense? - 2008-07-10

From UmbraXenu
Jump to: navigation, search
F139.png Backbreaker: A half-kilo of blow, machine-gun blasts, and a millionaire chiropractor. Does this make sense? July 10, 2008, Thomas Francis, New Times Broward-Palm Beach

The company was Goroway's creation, but it owed a debt to Dr. David Singer, a chiropractor who had long run his own seminar series. Goroway became a client of Singer's around 1991. He paid careful attention not just to the business concepts Singer preached but to Singer's delivery, his magnetic presence.

Those seminars, it turned out, had also become a kind of recruiting tool for Singer, a devotee of the Church of Scientology, the controversial self-help system maligned as a cult by critics. Boulis was enamored of Singer too and followed him into Scientology. Goroway would later note that Boulis "chipped away" at him until finally, around 1999, as he was getting Practice Mechanix off the ground, he joined the church.

By 2001, Practice Mechanix was using telemarketers and junk faxes to reach chiropractors. At its peak, Goroway claimed the company had 125 employees, a 34-seat telemarketing house in Pittsburgh, and $650,000 in operating expenses per month. Much of its success came from concepts of business organization that Goroway learned through Scientology, he would later say.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Thomas | last = Francis | title = Backbreaker: A half-kilo of blow, machine-gun blasts, and a millionaire chiropractor. Does this make sense? | url = https://www.browardpalmbeach.com/news/backbreaker-6343281 | work = New Times Broward-Palm Beach | date = July 10, 2008 | accessdate = February 7, 2019 }}