Getting rid of QAnon won't be as easy as Twitter might think - 2020-07-23

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F0.png Getting rid of QAnon won't be as easy as Twitter might think July 23, 2020, Casey Newton, The Verge

Every tech platform has two policies about what they will allow: the policy that's written, and the policy that's enforced. Ideally there would be no gap between these, but in practice it almost can't be helped.

To take one dumb example, the embryonic audio social network Clubhouse posted its first set of community guidelines the other week. One of these rules says "we prohibit the spread of or attempts to spread false information or news." In theory, this means that only the truth is allowed on Clubhouse. Not a bad policy, really, but when you're building a network that someday anyone will be able to use to essentially broadcast their phone calls, I imagine that Clubhouse will find it extremely hard to enforce. Of course people will lie on Clubhouse. They will lie all the time. The question is who will be punished for doing so.

I thought about all this on Tuesday night after reading that Twitter had banned 7,000 accounts and put restrictions on 150,000 more related to the sprawling conspiracy theory slash alternate reality game slash religion QAnon. Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny had the scoop at NBC News:

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Casey | last = Newton | title = Getting rid of QAnon won't be as easy as Twitter might think | url = https://www.theverge.com/interface/2020/7/23/21334255/twitter-qanon-ban-facebook-policy-enforcement-political-candidates | work = The Verge | date = July 23, 2020 | accessdate = July 25, 2020 }}