Harper's attack on science: No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy - 2013-05-01

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F0.png Harper's attack on science: No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy May 1, 2013, Carol Linnitt, Academic Matters

Science—and the culture of evidence and inquiry it supports—has a long relationship with democracy. Widely available facts have long served as a check on political power. Attacks on science, and on the ability of scientists to communicate freely, are ultimately attacks on democratic governance.

It's no secret the Harper government has a problem with science. In fact, Canada's scientists are so frustrated with this government's recent overhaul of scientific communications policies and cuts to research programs they took to the streets, marching on Parliament Hill last summer to decry the "Death of Evidence." Their concerns— expressed on their protest banners—followed a precise logic: "no science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy."

Since 2006, the Harper government has made bold moves to control or prevent the free flow of scientific information across Canada, particularly when that information highlights the undesirable consequences of industrial development. The free flow of information is controlled in two ways: through the muzzling of scientists who might communicate scientific information, and through the elimination of research programs that might participate in the creation of scientific information or evidence.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Carol | last = Linnitt | title = Harper's attack on science: No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy | url = https://academicmatters.ca/harpers-attack-on-science-no-science-no-evidence-no-truth-no-democracy/ | work = Academic Matters | date = May 1, 2013 | accessdate = October 3, 2019 }}