Harper's draconian laws and the mosque murderer's appeal - 2020-01-28

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F99.png Harper's draconian laws and the mosque murderer's appeal January 28, 2020, Nora Loreto, National Observer

The appeal of Alexandre Bissonnette, who pleaded guilty to killing six men at a mosque in Quebec City in 2017, was heard on Monday in Quebec City. At the Quebec Court of Appeal, both the Crown and the defence argued that Quebec Superior Court Justice François Huot erred in handing Alexandre Bissonnette a life sentence without the possibility of parole for 40 years last February.

The defence argued that Bissonnette should be eligible for parole after 25 years. The Crown argued that Bissonette should not be eligible for parole for 50 years.

Despite the fact that it was Bissonnette's appeal, Canada's maximum sentencing laws were the real focus of much of the proceedings. These laws were changed in 2011 by Stephen Harper. The Liberals have not undone the most severe parts of Harpers' so-called tough-on-crime legislation.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Nora | last = Loreto | title = Harper's draconian laws and the mosque murderer's appeal | url = https://www.nationalobserver.com/2020/01/28/opinion/harpers-draconian-laws-and-mosque-murderers-appeal | work = National Observer | date = January 28, 2020 | accessdate = January 29, 2020 }}