How a Canadian scientist became the voice of the anti-Harper movement - 2015-10-02

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F345.png How a Canadian scientist became the voice of the anti-Harper movement October 2, 2015, Suzanne Goldenberg, The Guardian

As protest songs go, it wasn't exactly Pussy Riot. Harperman is a jaunty folk song with acoustic guitars, an amateur choir, and a chorus politely telling Canada's prime minister Stephen Harper, "It's time for you to go."

But the five-minute protest song became a viral hit, got its mild-mannered creator suspended from his job at the country's environment department – and gave voice to the pent-up frustrations of Canada's public servants who say they have found themselves at the receiving end of Harper's policies.

Over the last nine years, the prime minister has often clashed with the public service, cutting monitoring stations, pulping research libraries, slow-walking studies that would trigger protections for endangered species such as sharks, and banning scientists from discussing their work with other scientists or journalists, even after its publication.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Suzanne | last = Goldenberg | title = How a Canadian scientist became the voice of the anti-Harper movement | url = https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/oct/02/canadaman-protest-song-harperman-stephen-harper | work = The Guardian | date = October 2, 2015 | accessdate = October 3, 2019 }}