How the Boogaloo movement rose from an internet joke to an armed movement in the U.S. - 2020-06-06

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F182.png How the Boogaloo movement rose from an internet joke to an armed movement in the U.S. June 6, 2020, CBC News

A loose collective known as the Boogaloo movement is united in a belief that a second U.S. civil war is coming — but with no unifying political ideology, the movement defies easy definition, says journalist Robert Evans.

Its adherents are just as likely to support anti-racism protesters speaking out against police brutality, he said, as they are to support people decrying COVID-19 lockdowns to help further their cause.

"They're all kind of unified by their fascination with this kind of meme of preparing for a civil war in the United States — and as much as that, this idea of a real hatred of the police, of law enforcement, federal and local, and a desire to kind of do battle with the state," Evans, an investigative journalist for the website Bellingcat, told Day 6 host Brent Bambury.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | title = How the Boogaloo movement rose from an internet joke to an armed movement in the U.S. | url = https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/from-little-rock-to-george-floyd-a-poem-for-the-protests-the-boogaloos-pride-during-a-pandemic-and-more-1.5598305/how-the-boogaloo-movement-rose-from-an-internet-joke-to-an-armed-movement-in-the-u-s-1.5598461 | work = CBC News | date = June 6, 2020 | accessdate = June 7, 2020 }}