Proroguing Parliament without cause? Canadians want it banned - 2013-08-23

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F132.png Proroguing Parliament without cause? Canadians want it banned August 23, 2013, Duff Conacher, Globe and Mail

While it is normal for a prime minister or provincial premier to prorogue the legislature to set out a new government agenda, many prorogations in the past decade have been for what many see as unjustifiable lengths of time, and for unjustifiable reasons. The rules are not clear and enforcement is ineffective – and a large majority of Canadians want these problems fixed.

In November 2003, then-Prime Minister Jean Chrétien prorogued Parliament in part to avoid the tabling of the Auditor-General report into the Adscam scandal while he was still in power. Some would claim that Chrétien's prorogation was justifiable because Paul Martin was becoming prime minister and it allowed him to start fresh with a Speech from the Throne.

However, Mr. Martin and his new cabinet had the usual mid-December-to-early-February parliamentary break to prepare their plans, and if he wanted to start fresh he could have prorogued Parliament himself sometime during that break.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Duff | last = Conacher | title = Proroguing Parliament without cause? Canadians want it banned | url = https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/proroguing-parliament-without-cause-canadians-want-it-banned/article13935119/ | work = Globe and Mail | date = August 23, 2013 | accessdate = June 4, 2019 }}