Spy vs. spy: How Scientology and the CIA battled 40 years ago - 2019-03-05

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F43.png Spy vs. spy: How Scientology and the CIA battled 40 years ago March 5, 2019, Ian Shapira, Washington Post

> Mary Sue Hubbard, wearing sunglasses in the center, wife of the founder of Scientology, L. Ron Hubbard, leaves court in Washington on Aug. 17, 1978. (Ira Schwarz) By Ian Shapira Ian Shapira Enterprise reporter covering the Washington region and beyond Email Bio Follow March 5 at 7:00 AM The tiny article inside the The Washington Post on Jan. 13, 1979, read like something from a cartoonishly sinister spy show: "CIA documents released yesterday show the agency once considered using drugs, shock treatments and even removal of parts of the brain to 'dispose of blown agents, exploited defectors and defecting trainees.'"

The CIA wanted to cut out parts of people's brains? The Post article says the agency memo makes it clear that "lethal methods were ruled out."

By then, the American public had read countless stories about investigations into Langley's infamous program code-named "MK-Ultra," which carried out mind-control drug experiments in the 1950s and 1960s on U.S. and Canadian citizens. But this small wire story in the Post seemed to add a new, more menacing allegation in the saga of the CIA's once-top-secret efforts.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Ian | last = Shapira | title = Spy vs. spy: How Scientology and the CIA battled 40 years ago | url = https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2019/03/05/spy-vs-spy-how-scientology-cia-waged-war-years-ago/ | work = Washington Post | date = March 5, 2019 | accessdate = March 5, 2019 }}