The 'antifa super-soldier' conspiracy theory is dangerous because people want to believe it - 2017-11-03

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F0.png The 'antifa super-soldier' conspiracy theory is dangerous because people want to believe it November 3, 2017, Adi Robertson, The Verge

On November 4th, an activist group called Refuse Fascism says it will hold rallies in 20 cities, aiming to remove Donald Trump and Mike Pence from office through persistent mass protest. Refuse Fascism compares its project to last year's South Korean protests against President Park Geun-hye, which ended with Park's impeachment in March. It's aiming to start with "at least several thousand people" in the rallies, and continue with semi-permanent encampments.

Alternately, according to certain sectors of the internet, a unified anti-white terrorist group known as "Antifa" will launch a violent civil war, possibly backed by billionaire George Soros and shadowy forces within the US government, who are quietly organizing a mass electrical blackout to coincide with the uprising. This is the theory that's been incubating online since August, and it's blown up this week, thanks to coverage by InfoWars and other conspiracy sites. Compared to saying the world is flat, it's not the most unbelievable internet conspiracy theory in recent memory, but it's one of the most potentially dangerous ones — because even if the facts don't hit anywhere close to reality, the effects might.

The "antifa civil war," to make things absolutely clear, isn't a real thing. Snopes has refuted news of both the supposed uprising itself and the blackout drill. But the theory has become a bizarre meme over the past several days, as jokesters make clearly ridiculous claims about antifa bogeyman, only to have them co-opted as evidence of a terrorist plot. Right-wing blog The Gateway Pundit posted a copy of a joke originally by Twitter comedian Krang T Nelson, claiming that "millions of antifa supersoldiers will behead all white parents and small business owners." (The post was later amended, though it still condemned the tweet as "normalization of anti-white violence.") A press release from "Anti-Fascist Action LLC Co. Inc." announced the group would "execute all Trump voters and gun owners," directing questions to an official "antifa media liaison" named Mohammed Markstein. Most people called the joke, but at least a few seem to have reposted it seriously.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Adi | last = Robertson | title = The 'antifa super-soldier' conspiracy theory is dangerous because people want to believe it | url = https://www.theverge.com/2017/11/3/16602158/antifa-super-soldier-refuse-fascism-conspiracy-theory | work = The Verge | date = November 3, 2017 | accessdate = March 2, 2020 }}