The Church of QAnon: Will conspiracy theories form the basis of a new religious movement? - 2020-05-18

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F0.png The Church of QAnon: Will conspiracy theories form the basis of a new religious movement? May 18, 2020, Marc-André Argentino, The Conversation

Followers of the QAnon movement believe in wild and dangerous conspiracy theories about U.S. President Donald Trump. Now a faction within the movement has been interpreting the Bible through QAnon conspiracies.

I have been studying the growth of the QAnon movement as part of my research into how extremist religious and political organizations create propaganda and recruit new members to ideological causes.

On Feb. 23, I logged onto Zoom to observe the first public service of what is essentially a QAnon church operating out of the Omega Kingdom Ministry (OKM). I've spent 12 weeks attending this two-hour Sunday morning service.

What I've witnessed is an existing model of neo-charismatic home churches — the neo-charismatic movement is an offshoot of evangelical Protestant Christianity and is made up of thousands of independent organizations — where QAnon conspiracy theories are reinterpreted through the Bible. In turn, QAnon conspiracy theories serve as a lens to interpret the Bible itself.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Marc-André | last = Argentino | title = The Church of QAnon: Will conspiracy theories form the basis of a new religious movement? | url = https://theconversation.com/the-church-of-qanon-will-conspiracy-theories-form-the-basis-of-a-new-religious-movement-137859 | work = The Conversation | date = May 18, 2020 | accessdate = March 6, 2021 }}