The Conservative War on Liberal Media Has a Long History - 2014-01-17

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F374.png The Conservative War on Liberal Media Has a Long History January 17, 2014, Nicole Hemmer, The Atlantic

Conservatives spent most of the 1950s establishing their own media outlets: publications like National Review and Human Events, publishing houses like Regnery and Devin-Adair, and broadcasts like the Manion Forum and the Dan Smoot Report.

But two events in the early 1960s convinced the right that creating conservative media wasn't enough to achieve balance. Conservatives would also have to discredit existing media.

The first, centering on the Federal Communications Commission, persuaded them that liberal bias was a product not just of journalists but of the government itself. Conservative discontent with the FCC focused on the Fairness Doctrine, a broadcast standard meant to regulate controversial issues on radio and television. Conservatives felt the Fairness Doctrine unfairly tilted the playing field against them. Though devised to encourage controversial broadcasting, in practice the doctrine often led broadcasters to avoid controversy so they wouldn't have to give away free airtime. To conservatives, avoiding controversy inevitably meant silencing right-wing voices.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Nicole | last = Hemmer | title = The Conservative War on Liberal Media Has a Long History | url = https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/01/the-conservative-war-on-liberal-media-has-a-long-history/283149/ | work = The Atlantic | date = January 17, 2014 | accessdate = May 20, 2022 }}