The Contrarian Coronavirus Theory That Informed the Trump Administration - 2020-03-29

From UmbraXenu
Jump to: navigation, search
F188.png The Contrarian Coronavirus Theory That Informed the Trump Administration March 29, 2020, Isaac Chotiner, New Yorker

President Trump, who at one point called the coronavirus pandemic an "invisible enemy" and said it made him a "wartime President," has in recent days questioned its seriousness, tweeting, "WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF." Trump said repeatedly that he wanted the country to reopen by Easter, April 12th, contradicting the advice of most health officials. (On Sunday, he backed down and extended federal social-distancing guidelines for at least another month.) According to the Washington Post, "Conservatives close to Trump and numerous administration officials have been circulating an article by Richard A. Epstein of the Hoover Institution, titled 'Coronavirus Perspective,' which plays down the extent of the spread and the threat."

Epstein, a professor at New York University School of Law, published the article on the Web site of the Hoover Institution, on March 16th. In it, he questioned the World Health Organization's decision to declare the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, said that "public officials have gone overboard," and suggested that about five hundred people would die from COVID-19 in the U.S. Epstein later updated his estimate to five thousand, saying that the previous number had been an error. So far, there have been more than two thousand coronavirus-related fatalities in America; epidemiologists' projections of the total deaths range widely, depending on the success of social distancing and the availability of medical resources, but they tend to be much higher than Epstein's. (On Sunday, Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, estimated that there could be between a hundred thousand and two hundred thousand deaths in the U.S.) In a follow-up article, published on March 23rd and titled "Coronavirus Overreaction," Epstein wrote, "Progressives think they can run everyone's lives through central planning, but the state of the economy suggests otherwise. Looking at the costs, the public commands have led to a crash in the stock market, and may only save a small fraction of the lives that are at risk."

Epstein has long been one of the most cited legal scholars in the country, and is known for his libertarian-minded reading of the Constitution, which envisions a restrained federal government that respects private property. He has also been known to engage with controversial subjects; last fall, he published an article on the Hoover Institution Web site that argued, "The professional skeptics are right: there is today no compelling evidence of an impending climate emergency." Last Wednesday, I spoke by phone with Epstein about his views of the coronavirus pandemic. He was initially wary of talking, and asked to record his own version of the call, which I agreed to. During our conversation, which has been edited for length and clarity, Epstein made a number of comments about viruses that have been strongly disputed by medical professionals. We have included factual corrections alongside those statements.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Isaac | last = Chotiner | title = The Contrarian Coronavirus Theory That Informed the Trump Administration | url = https://www.newyorker.com/news/q-and-a/the-contrarian-coronavirus-theory-that-informed-the-trump-administration | work = New Yorker | date = March 29, 2020 | accessdate = March 30, 2020 }}