The Making of an American Nazi - 2017-11-14

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F374.png The Making of an American Nazi November 14, 2017, Luke O’Brien, The Atlantic

The calls marked the start of a months-long campaign of harassment orchestrated by Andrew Anglin, the publisher of the world's biggest neo-Nazi website, The Daily Stormer. He claimed that Gersh was trying to "extort" a property sale from Sherry Spencer, whose son, Richard Spencer, was another prominent white nationalist and the face of the so-called alt-right movement.

The Spencers had long-standing ties to Whitefish, and Richard had been based there for years. But he gained international notoriety just after the 2016 election for giving a speech in Washington, D.C., in which he declared "Hail Trump!," prompting Nazi salutes from his audience. In response, some Whitefish residents considered protesting in front of a commercial building Sherry owned in town. According to Gersh, Sherry sought her advice, and Gersh suggested that she sell the property, make a donation to charity, and denounce her son's white-nationalist views. But Sherry claimed that Gersh had issued "terrible threats," and she wrote a post on Medium on December 15 accusing her of an attempted shakedown. (Sherry Spencer did not respond to a request for comment.)

At the time, Richard Spencer and Andrew Anglin barely knew each other. Spencer, who fancies himself white nationalism's leading intellectual, cloaks his racism in highbrow arguments. Anglin prefers the gutter, reveling in the vile language common on the worst internet message boards. But Spencer and Anglin had appeared together on a podcast the day before Sherry's Medium post was published and expressed their mutual admiration. Anglin declared it a "historic" occasion, a step toward greater unity on the extreme right.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Luke | last = O’Brien | title = The Making of an American Nazi | url = https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/12/the-making-of-an-american-nazi/544119/ | work = The Atlantic | date = November 14, 2017 | accessdate = June 10, 2019 }}