The QAnon orphans: people who have lost loved ones to conspiracy theories - 2020-09-23

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F345.png The QAnon orphans: people who have lost loved ones to conspiracy theories September 23, 2020, Cecilia Saixue Watt, The Guardian

In early June, however, they had a major fight. Daniel had heard from their mother that Greg was posting on social media about the Boogaloo Boys, an armed far-right movement in the US that seeks to incite civil war. When Daniel called to confront his brother about the extent of his involvement with them, Greg had insisted that the Boogaloo movement was just an internet joke – but he also said that he hoped the country would, indeed, descend into civil war. The brothers argued and hung up on each other.

On 1 July, Daniel called to apologize. Greg said he was busy, as he was on his way to a counter-protest to a Black Lives Matter (BLM) rally in Lawrence, Kansas. He had packed his guns in the car, and was intent on helping local police identify BLM protesters. According to Greg, protesters and antifascist activists were "looting and rioting", and he intended to do his part to stop them. "He said that antifa was lynching people and sending them to re-education camps," said Daniel.

The demonstration was not without violence, though not on the protesters' part: two cars attempted to plow through the crowd; no injuries were reported. There was no truth to what Greg had said. The brothers have not spoken since.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Cecilia Saixue | last = Watt | title = The QAnon orphans: people who have lost loved ones to conspiracy theories | url = https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/23/qanon-conspiracy-theories-loved-ones | work = The Guardian | date = September 23, 2020 | accessdate = September 24, 2020 }}