The extremist philosophy that's more violent than the alt-right and growing in popularity - 2019-11-11

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F0.png The extremist philosophy that's more violent than the alt-right and growing in popularity November 11, 2019, Zack Beauchamp, Vox

These killings were often linked to the alt-right, described as an outgrowth of the movement's rise in the Trump era. But many of these suspected killers, from Atomwaffen thugs to the New Zealand mosque shooter to the Poway synagogue attacker, are more tightly connected to a newer and more radical white supremacist ideology, one that dismisses the alt-right as cowards unwilling to take matters into their own hands.

It's called "accelerationism," and it rests on the idea that Western governments are irreparably corrupt. As a result, the best thing white supremacists can do is accelerate their demise by sowing chaos and creating political tension. Accelerationist ideas have been cited in mass shooters' manifestos — explicitly, in the case of the New Zealand killer — and are frequently referenced in white supremacist web forums and chat rooms.

Accelerationists reject any effort to seize political power through the ballot box, dismissing the alt-right's attempts to engage in mass politics as pointless. If one votes, one should vote for the most extreme candidate, left or right, to intensify points of political and social conflict within Western societies. Their preferred tactic for heightening these contradictions, however, is not voting, but violence — attacking racial minorities and Jews as a way of bringing us closer to a race war, and using firearms to spark divisive fights over gun control. The ultimate goal is to collapse the government itself; they hope for a white-dominated future after that.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Zack | last = Beauchamp | title = The extremist philosophy that's more violent than the alt-right and growing in popularity | url = https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/11/11/20882005/accelerationism-white-supremacy-christchurch | work = Vox | date = November 11, 2019 | accessdate = January 31, 2020 }}