Two years after Scientology's 'Super Power' debuted, it's still a flop - 2015-10-20

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F347.png Two years after Scientology's 'Super Power' debuted, it's still a flop October 20, 2015, Tony Ortega, Underground Bunker

The Telegraph yesterday posted a number of photos from inside the "new" Scientology Flag Building in Clearwater, which actually opened a couple of years ago. (This isn't even the first time we've seen actual photos from inside the building, which we brought you in 2013.) The occasion, the newspaper said, was that the photos had been released by "Vantage News," which is a PR firm in England. So, in other words, this was the latest "look upon our works, and despair" moment from Scientology leader David Miscavige.

But the release of these photos from inside the "Super Power" building only reminded us of how we kept a close eye on this overblown funhouse years before it actually opened. And it also gave us an opportunity to reflect on what little impact the place has had after such a long buildup. Super Power, in fact, turned out to be a Super Dud. And with so much bad news happening for the church, it's interesting to see Miscavige try to get some publicity out of a place the public can never enter.

If you're not sure what we're talking about, we're referring to a massive, city-block sized building in Clearwater that Scientology finally opened in November 2013 after first breaking ground fifteen years earlier, in 1998. The building cost something like $80 million to construct, but Mike Rinder and other former church officials say the project raised as much as $200 million or more as it became another cash cow, one of many different initiatives church members were pressured to donate to over the years.


{{cite news | author = Tony Ortega | title = Two years after Scientology's 'Super Power' debuted, it's still a flop | url = https://tonyortega.org/2015/10/20/two-years-after-scientologys-super-power-debuted-its-still-a-flop/ | work = Underground Bunker | date = October 20, 2015 | accessdate = August 21, 2017 }}