What Gamergate should have taught us about the 'alt-right' - 2016-12-01

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F345.png What Gamergate should have taught us about the 'alt-right' December 1, 2016, Matt Lees, The Guardian

It's understandable that the world didn't much care about Gamergate. The 2014 hashtag campaign, ostensibly founded to protest about perceived ethical failures in games journalism, clearly thrived on hate – even though many of those who aligned themselves with the movement either denied there was a problem with harassment, or wrote it off as an unfortunate side effect. Sure, women, minorities and progressive voices within the industry were suddenly living in fear. Sure, those who spoke out in their defence were quickly silenced through exhausting bursts of online abuse. But that wasn't why people supported it, right? They were disenfranchised, felt ignored, and wanted to see a systematic change.

Is this all sounding rather familiar now? Does it remind you of something? If you're just discovering the world of angry, anonymous online dudes masquerading as victims – hi, come in. Some of us have been here for a while.

The similarities between Gamergate and the far-right online movement, the "alt-right", are huge, startling and in no way a coincidence. After all, the culture war that began in games now has a senior representative in The White House. As a founder member and former executive chair of Brietbart News, Steve Bannon had a hand in creating media monster Milo Yiannopoulos, who built his fame and Twitter following by supporting and cheerleading Gamergate. This hashtag was the canary in the coalmine, and we ignored it.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Matt | last = Lees | title = What Gamergate should have taught us about the 'alt-right' | url = https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/dec/01/gamergate-alt-right-hate-trump | work = The Guardian | date = December 1, 2016 | accessdate = October 18, 2021 }}