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Blog: What's Going On? - 2013-06-29

F0.png What's Going On? June 29, 2013, Marty Rathbun, Moving On Up a Little Higher

I came across an interesting passage in a book – the passage originally published in 1963 – by a prominent psychologist predicting quantum advancements in human consciousness by the marrying of religious and philosophic wisdom with rapidly evolving science. It is fifty years later and it seems Scientology is only now beginning to go through the throes of differentiating the adults (truth seeking spiritualists and values inspired scientists) from the children (flat earth religionists and reductionist-mechanistic inclined scientists). Scientology seems, to steal a verse from U2, stuck in a moment that it can't get out of. From Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences, by Abraham H. Maslow:

These two groups (sophisticated theologians and sophisticated scientists) seem to be coming closer and closer together in their conception of the universe as 'organismic', as having some kind of unity and integration, as growing and evolving and having direction and, therefore, having some kind of 'meaning.' Whether or not to call this integration 'God' finally gets to be an arbitrary decision and a personal indulgence determined by one's personal myths. John Dewey, an agnostic, decided for strategic and communicative purposes to retain the word 'God', defining it in a naturalistic way. Others have decided against using it also for strategic reasons. What we wind up with is a new situation in the history of the problem in which a 'serious' Buddhist let us say, one who is concerned with 'ultimate concerns' and with Tillich's 'dimensions of depth', is more co-religionist to a 'serious' agnostic than he is to a conventional, superficial, other-directed Buddhist for whom religion is only habit or custom, i.e., behavior.

Indeed, these 'serious' people are coming so close together as to suggest that they are becoming a single party of mankind, the earnest ones, the seeking, the questioning, probing ones, the ones who are not sure, the ones with a 'tragic sense of life', the explorers of the depths and of the heights, the 'saving remnant.' The other party then is made up of all the superficial, the moment-bound, the herebound ones, those who are totally absorbed with the trivial, those who are 'plated with piety, not alloyed with it', those who are reduced to the concrete, to the momentary, and to the immediately selfish. Almost, we could say, we wind up with adults, on the one hand, and children, on the other.