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Get to Know the Memes of the Alt-Right and Never Miss a Dog-Whistle Again - 2017-01-25

F0.png Get to Know the Memes of the Alt-Right and Never Miss a Dog-Whistle Again January 25, 2017, Justin Caffier, Vice News

Memes and the alt-right go together like peanut butter and jelly that's been spread into the shape of a swastika. Internet memes are, by and large, the currency in which these young nationalists trade, eschewing the stuffy, articulated treatises of Mein Kampf in favor of more virality-friendly catchphrases and image macros to be proliferated around image boards and subreddits.

Additionally, the movement is in and of itself a semi-self-aware meme that seems to only exist within the safe, anonymous spaces of the internet. Just as memes tend to be cringey and ineffective when taken offline, one of the alt-right's most publicized IRL events, the "DeploraBall" was widely regarded as a colossal shit-show due to the physical and ideological infighting.

Shit-posting for keks is also trickier to dismiss when done out in the real world without the mask of anonymity. White supremacist and human punching bag Richard Spencer, the poster child of the alt-right, has claimed his "Heil Trump" chanting at a post-election rally was done in the spirit of "irony." This jives with Spencer's calls for "peaceful ethnic cleansing" at the 2013 American Renaissance conference but serves to highlight the notion that darker machinations often lay beneath the group's claims of simply wanting to troll SJWs.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Justin | last = Caffier | title = Get to Know the Memes of the Alt-Right and Never Miss a Dog-Whistle Again | url = https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/ezagwm/get-to-know-the-memes-of-the-alt-right-and-never-miss-a-dog-whistle-again | work = Vice News | date = January 25, 2017 | accessdate = January 3, 2020 }}