Scientology's spies: L. Ron Hubbard's twisted legacy that proved his sickness - 2017-04-01

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F347.png Scientology's spies: L. Ron Hubbard's twisted legacy that proved his sickness April 1, 2017, Tony Ortega, Underground Bunker

Jon Atack is the author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. He has a new edition of the book for sale, and for more than three years he's been helping us sift through the legends, myths, and contested facts about Scientology that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet.

L. Ron Hubbard's list of characteristics for the "antisocial personality" seem to derive largely from Hervey Cleckley's earlier work, published as The Mask of Sanity. Cleckley laid the foundation for the contemporary understanding of the personality disorder, known elsewhere as psychopathy, sociopathy, and narcissism in its variants.

It is interesting to look at the characteristics in light of Hubbard's directives to the Guardian's Office – rebranded as the Office of Special Affairs, after Mary Sue Hubbard and ten others were convicted of burglary, breaking and entering, false imprisonment, kidnapping and theft (Thirty-eight others, including Hubbard and Scientology's lead attorney, Kendrick Moxon, were named as "unindicted co-conspirators" and there were also successful prosecutions in Canada and France stemming from similar conduct.)

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | author = Tony Ortega | title = Scientology's spies: L. Ron Hubbard's twisted legacy that proved his sickness | url = https://tonyortega.org/2017/04/01/scientologys-spies-l-ron-hubbards-twisted-legacy-that-proved-his-sickness/ | work = Underground Bunker | date = April 1, 2017 | accessdate = August 21, 2017 }}