The "Alt-Right" Lives at a Think Tank in Small-Town Montana - 2016-10-09

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F354.png The "Alt-Right" Lives at a Think Tank in Small-Town Montana October 9, 2016, Emma Grey Ellis, Wired

The term "alt-right" probably makes you think of Twitter or a dark subreddit, or 4chan, or some social medium occupied by meme-slinging, Trump-supporting, unapologetically bigoted provocateurs. You probably don't think of a PO box in Whitefish, Montana. But that's the alt-right's street address.

More precisely, it's where you send mail to the National Policy Institute, the think tank that built the movement. The president is Richard Spencer, who coined the term "alternative right" in 2008 in an article he wrote for a far-right website. And when you follow the alt-right back home, the movement's goofy, social media-friendly trappings fall away. NPI doesn't actually traffic in cartoon frogs and fedoras. The people who run it are just white supremacists.

On paper, NPI doesn't look influential. It's a website, a PO box, a Google Voice number, and -- -according to its last available tax forms -- -$16,000 worth of assets and an annual income that barely cracks six figures. NPI publishes research papers and books -- -classics like "Racial Differences in Intelligence, Personality, and Behavior" and The Red Pill. (The phrase "red pill" has mutated from a Matrix reference about embracing painful truths to a shorthand for supporting racism and misogyny.) NPI's mission statement describes its members as "dedicated to the heritage, identity, and future of people of European descent in the United States, and around the world." They're serious: Spencer himself was denounced by and deported from Hungary -- -a famously xenophobic country -- -for organizing a pan-European white supremacist event.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Emma Grey | last = Ellis | title = The "Alt-Right" Lives at a Think Tank in Small-Town Montana | url = https://www.wired.com/2016/10/alt-right-grew-obscure-racist-cabal/ | work = Wired | date = October 9, 2016 | accessdate = January 31, 2023 }}