The far-right's favorite social network is facing its own censorship controversy - 2017-09-06

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F0.png The far-right's favorite social network is facing its own censorship controversy September 6, 2017, Adi Robertson, The Verge

Social network Gab.ai, known as an anything-goes haven for the far-right, is seeing blowback from the past month's online white supremacist crackdown. CEO Andrew Torba writes that last week, domain registrar AsiaRegistry told Gab to take down a post by the founder of neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer. Torba complied, but in the process, he set off a debate over the platform's "free speech" bona fides — and the state of moderating online hate speech.

Gab promotes itself as a non-politically affiliated anti-censorship platform, but it hosts several high-profile far-right or "alt-right" users who have been banned from other services over hate speech or harassment, including the Daily Stormer's Andrew Anglin. According to Torba, AsiaRegistry said that one of Anglin's posts, which mocked alleged Charlottesville murder victim Heather Heyer, violated the registrar's abuse policy. After receiving a formal complaint, AsiaRegistry gave Gab 48 hours to remove the post. (AsiaRegistry and its parent company CentralNic didn't immediately reply to a request for comment.)

Torba told Anglin to take the post down, but he didn't mention the registrar at first. Instead, he justified it on the technicality that Anglin hadn't appropriately tagged his comment as "not safe for work." Anglin responded by castigating Gab as a "fraud platform" with an interface like "a fucked up version of AOL in 1994," labeling Torba a "free-speech hoax artist." Other users joined him in criticizing, or threatening to leave the site.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Adi | last = Robertson | title = The far-right's favorite social network is facing its own censorship controversy | url = https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/6/16259150/gab-ai-registrar-andrew-anglin-daily-stormer-crackdown | work = The Verge | date = September 6, 2017 | accessdate = March 3, 2023 }}