There's a new tactic for exposing you to radical content online: the 'slow red-pill' - 2021-07-15

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F345.png There's a new tactic for exposing you to radical content online: the 'slow red-pill' July 15, 2021, Joshua Citarella, Opinion, The Guardian

I spend a lot of time on Instagram. Not posting stories, but researching Gen Z online political subcultures. That's how I first stumbled across a content strategy that I've dubbed the "slow red-pill".

A red-pill – the name is taken from the famous scene in the Matrix – is something that opens your eyes to a hidden political "truth". Once you've been red-pilled, you want other people to take the red-pill, too. Today, an essential part of online radicalization is the desire to spread this new knowledge to a larger audience.

I once followed the work of a group of far-right teenagers who devoted much of their time to radicalising people. The strategy was simple. They'd set up meme pages that, on the surface, appeared to be run-of-the-mill, Republican Maga-type accounts. The bio might read: Free Speech, Debate Welcome, Make America Great – by all outward appearances it would look like a regular conservative Instagram page. This account would repost high-performing content from big Republican pages (@DC_Draino, @the_typical_liberal, etc) and use the popularity of these images to accumulate a following of Fox, Breitbart and Turning Point USA-type viewers.

Wikipedia cite:
{{cite news | first = Joshua | last = Citarella | title = There's a new tactic for exposing you to radical content online: the 'slow red-pill' | url = https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jul/15/theres-a-new-tactic-for-exposing-you-to-radical-content-online-the-slow-red-pill | work = Opinion | publisher = The Guardian | date = July 15, 2021 | accessdate = July 18, 2021 }}